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The top 5 destinations for chocolate

If you love chocolate enough to travel around the world for it – these are the destinations for you.

Locals in Modica still follow ancient Aztec recipes

Locals in Modica still follow ancient Aztec recipes

Modica, Italy

Even though generations of families in Modica have been making chocolate since the 16th century, this tradition remains relatively secret. When Aztec recipes made their way back to Sicily with the Spanish conquistadors, locals began meticulously following these ingenious and exotic cacao recipes. Transformed into a bitter paste, the cacao was used to enhance savoury dishes, eaten as a supplement, or prepared with certain spices to act as an aphrodisiac. These days, the Sicilians use their knowledge to make a rich, dark, and crumbly chocolate. Try a truffle infused with citrus fruits or sprinkled with pistachios. Enjoy a rustic stay in the B&B Il Giardino Dei Mandarini, an old stone building right in the Baroque historic centre of Modica.

Take a tour of the chocolaterie in foodie destination, Yarra Glen

Take a tour of the chocolaterie in foodie destination, Yarra Glen

Yarra Glen, Australia

The Yarra Valley, just outside Melbourne, is an area that’s celebrated for its wineries, food markets, gourmet restaurants, and dairy farms. In Yarra Glen, you’ll also find a chocolaterie and ice creamery where expert chocolatiers craft decadent sweet treats using local dairy produce. You can take part in free chocolate tastings and take a tour of the grounds and showroom, finishing with a meal at the on-site café. Stay in the The Studio - Yarra Valley and enjoy a peaceful stay in this stylishly-decorated detached villa with views out over Yarra Glen.

Tain-l'Hermitage has a long-standing reputation for producing fine chocolate

Tain-l'Hermitage has a long-standing reputation for producing fine chocolate

Tain-l’Hermitage, France

This humble, historic town in the Ardèche in central France is a must for epicurean travellers, particularly those with a sweet tooth. Sitting on one side of the Rhone River, Tain l’Hermitage has a reputation for high-quality wine but it also has an illustrious reputation for chocolate. Truffles, chocolate bars, sauces, and powders can be purchased in the many boutiques that line the leafy boulevards. Enjoy a stay in beautifully-renovated former school building, Le Castel, right in the middle of town, on the banks of the Rhone River.

Keep warm with a thick hot chocolate during a Canela winter

Keep warm with a thick hot chocolate during a Canela winter

Canela, Brazil

The name Canela means ‘cinnamon’ in Portuguese and Spanish, and its history of chocolate-making dates back to the colonial invaders. In the 19th century, German immigrants colonized this hilly, cooler area of Brazil to build houses similar to their homes. Today, these Bavarian buildings remain, most of them now shops selling chocolate in every different shape and form, including thick, rich hot chocolate served in the winter months. Chalés Rincão Comprido is an accommodation with a real sense of Canela's history; well-equipped wooden lodges surrounded by greenery and with views of the mountains.

Bariloche is a town of chocolate shops and Swiss alpine-style architecture

Bariloche is a town of chocolate shops and Swiss alpine-style architecture

San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina

There are plenty of good reasons to visit Bariloche, chocolate being one of them. In the bewilderingly beautiful Patagonia region, known for its precipitous snowy peaks that glow lilac in the hazy high-altitude sun, Bariloche sits on the banks of Nahuel Huapi, a glacial lake circled by the Andes. The town is filled with chocolate shops and Swiss alpine-style architecture. Las Baitas offers cosy chalet-style accommodation with roaring fires and its own ski school for guests.

**These destinations were the top-rated cities for ‘chocolate’, according to Booking.com travellers. Destinations had to have over 500 endorsements for ‘chocolate’.