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Discover the Caribbean’s Secret Islands

The thought of a Caribbean getaway instantly summons images of deserted islands with white-sand beaches, swaying palms, and turquoise waves. To help Bookers find the island getaway of their dreams, we went to look for the Caribbean’s more remote and lesser-known islands.

Anegada, British Virgin Islands

Home to the 4th largest coral reef in the world

Home to the 4th largest coral reef in the world

Anegada is the northernmost of the British Virgin Islands and home to the largest barrier coral reef in the Caribbean – as well as fourth largest in the world. The 18-mile reef is as famous for its dazzling colors as it is for the high number of shipwrecks it has caused. Bookers can go scuba diving to fully experience its natural beauty and thriving marine life, including sea turtles and various schools of fish. When you’re back on land, pay a visit to Loblolly Bay or the island’s salt ponds where flamingos like to gather. When it comes to local food, the lobster here is considered the best in the Caribbean. Book at Four Diamonds Park Villas on Anegada, or else check in to the Lambert Beach Resort on the main island, Tortola.

Dominica, Lesser Antilles

Boeri Lake is the highest altitude lake in Dominica

Boeri Lake is the highest altitude lake in Dominica

With the striking amounts of greenery in Dominica, it’s no wonder that it’s also known as Nature Island. There are 3 nature reserves on Dominica, the largest of which is the impressive Morne Trois Pitons National Park. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site that sprawls along the spine of the island, covering almost 10% of its land mass. One of the park’s highlights is the boiling lake, a bubbling swirl of grey-blue waters releasing curls of vapor over the sage-green mountains. Beyond the park, the hot springs across this volcanic island are great for a refreshing dip after a long hike. For divers, Champagne Reef is a surreal spot where you can swim bubbling currents caused by volcanic springs beneath the ocean floor. When you come up for air, these apartments are a great place to stay.

Andros, The Bahamas

Though Andros is the largest island of the Bahamas, it’s strangely uninhabited, giving it a pleasant, tranquil air. On the island’s eastern shore, there are pine forests, white-sand beaches, and mangroves, while the western side is just empty swampland, referred to as “The Mud.” Local legend says the forests are home to Chickcharney, an owl-man creature, whose sighting is said to bring good luck. The ocean sinkholes in Blue Holes National Park are said to have a colossal, mythical octopus known as Lusca. Along the coast, visit the “Tongue of the Ocean” in the Andros Barrier Reef—an oceanic trench and submarine canyon that goes 6,000 feet deep—for guaranteed sightings of amazing marine life. Bookers can paddle back to shore for the night and relax the island’s eastern beaches near Small Hope Bay Lodge.

Providencia, Colombia

Unforgettable sunsets are guaranteed on Providencia

Unforgettable sunsets are guaranteed on Providencia

Providencia can only be reached from another Colombian island, San Andrés, which might be why it’s usually overlooked by tourists. Regardless, the island’s remote location is an advantage, allowing its plant life to flourish undisturbed. Mangroves and tropical forests grow across the island surrounded by a ring of blond-sand beaches. One of Providencia’s natural highlights is the Old Providence McBean Lagoon, a collection of keys, reefs, and lagoons that have earned the island’s nickname, “The Sea of Seven Colors.” The water shifts from turquoise to sky blue, which eventually steeps into a deep sapphire. Bookers should end a day of exploring with dinner at a local restaurant for some black crab laced with a fiery chilli sauce. Then sleep it off at the Hotel Encanto.

Carriacou, Grenada

There’s secret, sandy beach on Sandy Island at Carriacou’s western end

There’s secret, sandy beach on Sandy Island at Carriacou’s western end

Carriacou is one of Grenada’s 3 islands, but most just stick to the main island. Its name means “land of the reefs,” so look forward to the incredible snorkeling opportunities. One of the best is Sandy Island, a nature reserve and quiet, offshore escape, that’s likely to be totally silent besides the gently lapping waves. However, the island itself is home to a thriving cultural scene, marked by a fusion of African and European influences. The food lives up to Grenada’s “Spice Island” reputation, so make sure you try the saffron and coconut-infused “oil down” stew. Highlights of the island’s music festival scene include the annual String Band Festival and Maroon Celebration. Set up base in the island’s main city with a stay at Rosa Guesthouse.

#BeABooker and book your trip today.