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Mountains you can climb in a day

If you’re on a tight schedule, are allergic to tents, or just fancy the bragging rights of having climbed a mountain while still being back in time for dinner: here are some of the world’s mountains that you can climb in a day.

Aran Fawddwy in Snowdonia National Park, Wales

Aran Fawddwy (pronounced ‘aran vowthewi’)

Aran Fawddwy (pronounced ‘aran vowthewi’)

At 905 metres, the tallest mountain in Snowdonia National Park is, Aran Fawddwy (pronounced ‘aran vowthewi’), and only takes 4-5 hours to climb and has some of Wales’ most impressive scenery. Climbing on a sunny day will give you a view of the Park’s huge cliffs and verdant valleys, while even a cloudy day skies is still worth the climb as the misty landscape takes on an ethereal quality. Regardless of the weather, treat yourself to a hearty breakfast at Bryn Sion Farm before you set off.

Mount Fuji in Japan

Set off at night in order to reach the summit as the sun rises

Set off at night in order to reach the summit as the sun rises

Mount Fuji is Japan’s tallest mountain (3,776 metres), an active volcano and yet, somehow, it’s still possible to climb it in a day. It’s only possible to climb Mount Fuji from July to September, so call ahead to make sure there’s space for you at one of the rest huts. Most climbers use these huts to rest halfway to the peak and then set off at night in order to reach the summit as the sun rises. Appreciate a different kind of Japanese nature by staying at the Teiensaryo Yamanakako, surrounded by traditional gardens.

Świnica in the Tatra Mountains, Poland

It takes experienced climbers only three hours to reach the summit

It takes experienced climbers only three hours to reach the summit

During the summer months, the Tatra Mountains are covered in hiking trails and the 2,301 metre high Świnica is especially popular since it takes experienced climbers only takes three hours to reach the summit. As the main peak on the Polish-Slovakian border, Świnica has multiple approaches from the both sides, with many travellers choosing to take the cable car to the halfway point (a smaller mountain named Kasprowy Wierch) and ascend from there. Make sure that you have all the comforts of home by staying at the Wilcznik 10.

Cerro de la Silla in Monterrey, Mexico

Cerro de la Silla, a mass of contradictions

Cerro de la Silla, a mass of contradictions

Cerro de la Silla is a mass of contradictions. One of Mexico’s most awe-inspiring natural monuments, yet based in the metropolitan area of Nuevo León; this four-peaked mountain has become a symbol of the city of Monterrey, despite actually being technically located in Guadalupe. And despite the relatively short climb time of three hours, it’s also one of the most technically tricky climbs on this list. Make sure to book yourself a local guide, and for a room with a view of the mountain, check into the Live Aqua Urban Resort Monterey.

Mount Wilson in Colorado, USA

Most climbers start with the Kilpacker Trailhead via the Navajo Lake

Most climbers start with the Kilpacker Trailhead via the Navajo Lake

This one is slightly more of an endurance test than some of the others but it is still possible to climb Mount Wilson in a day. While the climbing never gets especially technical, it is arduous, whichever route you choose. Most climbers start with the Kilpacker Trailhead via the Navajo Lake; this trail introduces climbers to the area’s dense alpen forests, featuring low, shady valleys and soaring, near-vertical, alpine cliffs. From here it’s a day’s round-trip up either Mt. Wilson or Wilson’s Peak (two different summits), followed by an evening relaxing at the Lumiere Hotel.

Kékes in Hungary

Kékes is hardly a giant, but it is the highest mountain in Hungary

Kékes is hardly a giant, but it is the highest mountain in Hungary

At 1,015 metres high, Kékes is hardly a giant but, as the highest mountain in Hungary, it is still worth a climb. One of those rare mountains that can be enjoyed in most weather conditions, on a clear day it’s possible for see the peaks of the Bukk mountain range and even when it’s cold and foggy on the ground, the Kekes summit is relatively sunny and warm. Get your day off to a good start at the traditional Hungarian guesthouse Hidasi Erdesz Vendeghaz, and follow up your climb with a hearty meal and a stroll through the surrounding forest.