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A guide to Rome’s neighbourhoods: part one

We asked international travellers what they love most about each of Rome’s distinctive neighbourhoods and this is part one of what they told us. *

Ancient Landmarks

Rome's ancient rooftops at sunset

Rome's ancient rooftops at sunset

The Appio Latino neighbourhood is home to the Baths of Caracalla (which are just as ornate and magisterial as you’d expect from a Roman Emperor), the Circus of Maxentius (where ancient tournaments and sporting contests were held) and the Appian Way, one of the city’s best-preserved Roman roads.

The circular mausoleum of Santa Costanza

The circular mausoleum of Santa Costanza

Emperor Constantine chose Nomentano to build a circular mausoleum, the Santa Costanza, for his daughters. Named after the oldest daughter, Constantina, this beautiful memorial sits next-door to the split-level Catacombs of St. Agnese and only a short distance from Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura.

The Colosseum in the Tiburtino district

The Colosseum in the Tiburtino district

No matter which neighbourhoods you decide to visit, no visit to Rome is complete without a trip to see the Colosseum in the Tiburtino district. Hotels that overlook this ancient landmark include the Coroma al Colosseo self-catered apartments, the Relais Terme Di Tito and the Colosseum Apartments.

The Trionfale neighbourhood is located to the north of the Vatican and is mainly known for its gigantic market (the Mercato Trionfale). However, this area is most popular among travellers for its ancient landmarks. Specifically the often-overlooked Chiesa della Madonna del Rosario and the Basilica Parrocchiale San Giuseppe al Trionfale.

Art

Street art in the Garbatella neighbourhood

Street art in the Garbatella neighbourhood

Eur & Garbatella have traditionally been known as business and residential neighbourhoods respectively, but visitors are now increasingly starting to pick up on their burgeoning art scene. Visit the Ambra alla Garbatella for theatre, live music and modern art exhibitions, admire ancient art in a modern atmosphere at the Centrale Montemartini and stay in the Ostiense district for contemporary street art.

Fine Dining

Traditional Italian pizza

Traditional Italian pizza

The Aventino neighbourhood is praised by travellers for the fine-dining experiences on offer. Il Grottino offers traditional Italian pizza and an impressive wine list, the Apuleius has a playful take on culinary excellence (try the octopus gnocchi) and The Corner Townhouse has an on-site Michelin-starred restaurant.

Roman ruins

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

The San Giovanni neighbourhood gave its name to the San Giovanni in Laterano, which was Rome’s first basilica, and the 9th century Santa Maria Maggiore basilica is still used for an annual service by the Pope. A visit to the multilayered Basilica di San Clemente reveals ancient ruins from the 12th, 4th and even 2nd centuries.

Shopping

Discover Rome's independent boutiques

Discover Rome's independent boutiques

After a morning spent admiring and drinking coffee on the Spanish Steps, head further into Spagna for high-fashion and designer labels. Via Condotti is the obvious place to start and where you’ll find most big Italian and international brands on display, while surrounding streets like Via Borgognona offer a slightly more sedate experience.

The three shopping streets in the Trevi district make it a great destination for shoppers, with big names for label lovers and independent boutiques for those in search of something a bit different. With department stores and souvenir shops filling in the gaps, it’s easy to lose a few hours spent wandering through this bustling neighbourhood.

Spend a few hours window shopping in the Via Veneto district

Spend a few hours window shopping in the Via Veneto district

The Via Veneto district found international fame when it was used as the backdrop for Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita. Today, the main street is full of fashionable boutiques, authentic Italian crafts and hand-embroidered soft-furnishings. Once you’re all shopped-out, head to the Hotel Eden rooftop bar for a restorative cocktail.

As one of Rome’s most fashionable neighbourhoods, it’s hardly surprising that travellers love the shopping options on offer in Villa Borghese Parioli. Stores like Over Booking (street fashion and start-up labels) and Tech It Easy (vintage and contemporary tech) offer plenty of diversions, while more established names like Bagheera and Tricots showcase new designers.

** The data scientists at Booking.com looked at the top endorsement for each of Rome's neighbourhoods. Read part two here.